Dollhouse Decorating

Miniature Decorating Ideas |Articles on decorating dollhouses and the history of this artform

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I have had a life-long love affair with dollhouse miniatures, and careers in art education and interior design. I hope to combine these life experiences to help other miniature enthusiasts get more out of this wonderful hobby we enjoy, a hobby that often reaches the level of an art form. Susan Downing

Posted on 15 November, 2015

eugene-kupjack-washington's-headquarters

Eugene Kupjack – Washington’s Headquarters

Eugene Kupjack Besides The Thorne Rooms

A jeweler’s son, Eugene Kupjack began his career in miniatures in the 1930s while working on “The Thorne Rooms,” a series of 68 room boxes on permanent display at the Art Institute of Chicago. He created many works besides the Thorne Rooms. These four Presidential Room Boxes are examples.

eugene-kupjack-abraham-lincoln's-law-office

Eugene Kupjack – Abraham Lincoln’s Law Office

Through clever lighting techniques and placement of objects, Eugene Kupjack created the illusion that the room’s tiny inhabitants had just left the scene. His creations were

eugene-kupjack-thomas-jefferson's-bedroom

Eugene Kupjack -Thomas Jefferson’s Bedroom, Monticello

completed without the benefit of computerized technology or high-tech bonding materials. Most detailing was done by hand, using tools that ranged from a band saw to a tiny dental pick.

eugene-kupjack-general-grant's-dinig-room

Eugene Kupjack – General Grant’s Ding Room, Galena, Ohioene-grantdining

Today his sons Henry and Jay carry on their father’s legendary craftsmanship at the Kupjack Studios in Park Ridge, Illinois. Here is a link to my post “Henry Kupjack Miniaturist.

The four “Presidential Room Boxes are on exhibit at the Hoover Archives in the Herbert Hoover National Historic Site in West Branch, Iowa.

 

Susan  

Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: room boxes


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