Dollhouse Decorating

Miniature Decorating Ideas |Articles on decorating dollhouses and the history of this artform

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I have had a life-long love affair with dollhouse miniatures, and careers in art education and interior design. I hope to combine these life experiences to help other miniature enthusiasts get more out of this wonderful hobby we enjoy, a hobby that often reaches the level of an art form. Susan Downing

Posted on 10 December, 2016

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Ron Hubble’s Jacobean salon In the Miniature Museum of Taiwan

Beige Is Beautiful

In A Jacobean Room Box

Beige Is beautiful if you have more than one shade in the room. When working with a neutral as your primary color, go from light to dark hues on the walls, rug and large pieces furniture. The walls could be the lightest shade; curtains, a filmy darker hue; the rug a much darker shade. Be careful to keep these secondary colors compatible, that the undertones are in the same family. Because of the compacted spaces, unfortunate choices in color are more obvious in a miniature than a real room. But it’s a lot easier and cheaper to correct the mistake.

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Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: recycled


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Posted on 08 December, 2016

orange-victorian-house

Orange Victorian on Housekaboodle

Help Stamp Out Beige

Help Stamp Out Beige was the tag line in a paint manufacture’s advertisement in the ’70s, touting a new line of vibrant colors. I guess that’s what’s put me on this be bold with color binge.

Victorian dollhouse and miniatures are one of the most popular styles. So when it comes to color, be like the Atlanta residents in the 1870s. For those that could afford it, spectacular Victorian homes rose from the ashes of the Civil War. By the 1880s, when the Queen Anne style became popular, synthetic pigments allowed for vivid blues, greens, purples and yellows. Also common were multi-hue schemes that accentuated the style’s diverse architectural details, such as turned porch spindles and fish-scale shingles under the eaves.

Blog-Help-2BStamp_Red-2BVitorian-2Bdollhouse

Victorian dollhouse kit no longer available

A Wacky Tradition

red-victorian-dollhouse
Victorian dollhouse kit no longer available
Victorian homes also have a long and illustrious tradition of whacky color. Different colors helped to highlight the incredible details on these homes. Multicolored palettes can still be found on beautifully detailed homes today.

You really can’t go too far with your next Victorian dollhouse, or one that needs a remodel. The Victorians believed that if one detail would do, two was better. Better yet was to paint them a different color, not necessarily compatible. They loved repetition, like putting enlarged porch spindles on the front gables.

Paint schemes with several colors and sharp contrasts play up these architectural features. The more detail, the bolder you can be. Extremely ornate corbels can have sharp contrast between light and dark colors, while the less detailed panels can be painted in two dark colors.

victorian-painted-lady-brookline

Victorian Painted Lady in Brookline, Massachusetts

Painted Ladies

Why not a red dollhouse, or one patterned after the wondrous orange Victorian above, decorated by Sue Pekaric. And for inspiration, you can’t beat the Painted Ladies in San Francisco or some New England towns, like the beauty pictured here.

So fear not! Be as lavash as you want with color. Some might question your taste, but no one can accuse you of not being authentic.

What do you think? Can a Victorian dollhouse be too garish?

 

 

Susan Downing, with Patrick Owens

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I invite you to visit my Etsy Shop where I offer many accessories and pieces of furniture in 1:12 scale. Subscribers to this blog receive a discount on all Featured Products. Click here for details.

 

Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: recycled


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Posted on 07 December, 2016

tate-baby-house-doors-wide

Tate Baby House, on exhibit at the V&A Museum, London

Traveling Dolls Houses

The Social Structure

In 17th century Britain, Peers of the Realm controlled vast ares of land. Controlled, that is, if they kept up the agreed income to the Crown. Fall short and a Marquess, Viscount or Baron risked loosing all or a portion of his land. It was customary a Peer to tour his holdings as soon as roads dried in the early summer and continue “showing the flag” until the first frost.

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Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: amazing miniatures, cabinet


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Posted on 04 December, 2016

kensington-dolls-house-exterior-hartnell

The Hartnell’sKensington House has a side portico above a wine cellar. Found on the Daily Mail

The Hartnell’s Kensington House

Tim and Angela Hartnell, owners of Anglia Dolls House in Norfolk, modeled the Kensington House on an 1815 Regency property. Their attention to detail is paramount. To protect the 1:12 scale visitors from being exposed to the scurrying and clatter of the miniature staff bringing food to their table, each elegant reception rooms is entered from a servants’ corridor.

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Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: Regency


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