Category Archives: amazing miniatures

Posted on 19 February, 2017

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Kevin Mulvany touching-up the miniature Ham House entrance

Miniature Ham House

Susan Rogers and Kevin Mulvany are amazing artisans, responsible for some of the most expensive dolls houses ever made. They have been commissioned to create such 1:12 scale marvels as the Brighton Pavilion, Spencer House, and Buckingham Palace. One of their latest creations is a miniaturized version of historic Ham House in Surrey which was on display in the 17th-century Stuart manor house during the Summer and Fall of 2016.

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Posted by Patrick Owens

Categories: amazing miniatures, Stuart


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Posted on 29 January, 2017

frans-bosdyk-dollhouse

Frans Bosdyk and the Dollhouse, on exhibit at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney

The Bosdyk Dollhouse

It took 15,000 hours and many thousands of dollars for materials spent on the work. Frans Bosdyk made most of the furniture, which he researched in ‘Antique Furniture in Australia’ by Anthony Hill, and developed special lathes to turn the tiny wooden parts. He also fashioned his own tiny hand tools from 75-100mm concrete nails to make it easier for him to handle the small pieces. He used silky oak, cedar, myrtle and

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Posted by Patrick Owens


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Posted on 15 January, 2017

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Section of the White House replica being unloaded at an exhibition site. Source unknown.

Miniature White House

Using the word “miniature” to describe very large dollhouses has always seemed weird to me. That’s especially true with the 1/12the scale replica of the White House. This colossus is 60 feet long and 20 feet wide. It weighs 10 tons and goes on tour in a big rig. John Zweigel’s obsessions truly stretches the universe of “tiny things.”

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Posted by Patrick Owens


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Posted on 07 December, 2016

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Tate Baby House, on exhibit at the V&A Museum, London

Traveling Dolls Houses

The Social Structure

In 17th century Britain, Peers of the Realm controlled vast ares of land. Controlled, that is, if they kept up the agreed income to the Crown. Fall short and a Marquess, Viscount or Baron risked loosing all or a portion of his land. It was customary a Peer to tour his holdings as soon as roads dried in the early summer and continue “showing the flag” until the first frost.

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Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: amazing miniatures, cabinet


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