Category Archives: Tudor

Posted on 07 March, 2016

henry-VIII-royal-closed-stool-chamber-pot

Henry VIII Royal Closed Stool in his bedchamber at Sudeley Castle in the Cotswolds, the home of Katherine Parr, his sixth (and final) wife.

Tudor Dollhouse Toilets

When thinking about Tudor dollhouse toilets, remember that almost all hygienic functions in the Tudor era took place in the bedchamber or an adjacent alcove. Castle dwellers and the merchant class had choices. They could have a garderrobe, for instance. a sort of privy that hung on the outside of the building. Or they could use closed stools and chamber pots. But for most of the population, human waste was disposed of in the most convenient places: out back in the garden or out front in the street. Dollhouse enthusiasts need not be too graphic about the subject. We have choices too.
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Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: toilets, Tudor


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Posted on 21 February, 2016

tudor-hearth-kitchen-dollhouse

Tudor hearth found on The Tudor Dollhouse Project

Tudor Kitchens

A big difference between Tudor Manor House and Commoner kitchens were just how many they had, and the number of tools and appliances utilized. Hampton Court Palace wins the prize with 147 separate, well-equipped food preparation areas. A Commoner might make do with one large room, with too many cooks falling over each other to bring each coarse to table on time. A dollhouse enthusiast has so much choice when it comes to Tudor kitchen(s). I hope this article can be helpful, and perhaps be an inspiration for an exciting project.

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Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: kitchen, Tudor


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Posted on 15 February, 2016

dollhouse-tudor-windows

Danielle Le Brun’s “My Second Dollhouse” from her Miniature Memories blog.

History

When asked to describe Tudor architecture, most of us will respond with “timbers painted black with white plaster filling the spaces in between.” Good. Technically it’s called “half-timber, wattle and daub.” Half the width of the timber being exposed is obvious; waddle and daub, not so much. Waddle was a lattice work of thin branches, replaced in modern times by cedar or metal lath. The big change is in the “daub.” Formerly a mixture of clay, straw and manure, it has been replaced by a cement based plaster.

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Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: Tudor, windows


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Posted on 07 February, 2016

tudor-dollhouse--p-buckley-moss-museum

Tudor dollhouse on display at the P. Buckley Moss Museum in Waynesboro, Virginia

What’s Under Your Stairs?

The P. Buckley Moss Museum in Waynesboro, Virginia has an enormous Tudor dollhouse under the stairs, just outside the gift shop. It was designed and built by Joe and Ellen Waterbury. The Waterbury’s were dollhouse enthusiasts and collectors of Ms. Moss’ artwork, who wanted to express their appreciation with an elaborate miniature.

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Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: dollhouses, Tudor


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