Category Archives: Great Dollhouses

Posted on 01 September, 2016

nuremberg-house-facade-dollhouse

Facade of the Nuremberg House on display at the Victoria & Albert Museum

 

Nuremberg House

The Nuremberg House was made in 1673, and is the oldest dollhouse on display at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. It is small, measuring approximately 42” high, 36” wide and 18” deep, much smaller than most “puppenhausen” made in Nuremberg during that period.

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Posted by Susan Downing


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Posted on 04 June, 2016

elaine-diehl-astolat-castle-dollhouse

Elaine Diehl’s Astolat Castle Dollhouse, courtesy of Lois and Dr. Freeman

Elaine Diehl Master Artisan

Most famous dollhouse miniatures were created at the behest of wealthy patrons or collectors. Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle, Helena Rubinstein’s Room Boxes and The Catherine Palace commissioned by Carole Kaye, to name a few. The Astolate Castle was created by the artisan herself … with a little help from her friends.

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Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: artisans, Great Dollhouses


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Posted on 15 May, 2016

killer-cabinet-samll-stories

The Killer Cabinet, part of the Small Stories exhibit at the National Building Museum

Killer Cabinet Comes To Washington

The Killer Cabinet and eleven other famous dollhouses from the Victoria & Albert Childhood Museum dollhouse collection are on a world-tour. The “Small Stories: At Home in a Dollhousewill be on exhibit at the National Building Museum from May 21, 2016 to January 22, 2017. The exhibit features twelve houses containing approximately one thousand, nine hundred pieces of furniture, dolls and decorative items. It will include country mansions, suburban villas and high-rise apartments. One of the earliest examples is the 1760 Tate Baby House. The most recent, a 2001 Kaleidoscope post-modern family doll’s home.

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Posted by Susan Downing


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Posted on 29 March, 2016

 astolat-dollhouse-castle

Astolat Dollhouse Castle

Astolat Castle

There are hobbies, then there are obsessions. When Elaine Marie Diehl’s customers entered her miniature shop in Sedona, Arizona, the nine-foot, seven-tiered, meticulously decorated dollhouse just inside the door gave them a clue about the owner.

Making dollhouses began as a hobby for Elaine. She would come home from her day job working in “display art” and play with her latest creation. The miniatures grew in size and price. People dropped by her home unannounced to see her latest creation and after one particularly profitable sale, she decided to give up commercial art and play full time, opening Minielaine’s Miniature Shop in 1981.

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Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: Great Dollhouses


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