Category Archives: recycled

Posted on 15 January, 2018

tate-baby-house-doors-wide

Tate Baby House, on exhibit at the V&A Museum, London

Traveling Dolls Houses

The Social Structure

In 17th century Britain, Peers of the Realm controlled vast areas of land. Controlled, that is if they kept up the agreed income to the Crown. Fall short, and a Marquess, Viscount or Baron risked losing all or a portion of his land. It was customary a Peer to tour his holdings as soon as roads dried in the early summer and continue “showing the flag” until the first frost.

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Posted by Patrick Owens

Categories: recycled


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Posted on 12 January, 2018

queen-mary-dollhouse-bbc-fiona-bruce

Queen Mary’s Dolls House, facade with garden drawer pulled out. Found on the Royal Collection website.

Queen Mary’s Dolls House – In The Beginning

Queen Mary, wife of King George V. was an obsessive collector of ‘tiny craft.’She especially liked objects that had a connection to the Royal family. By her late 40s, the Queen had amassed a valuable collection of miniature items.

Princess Marie Louise, George V’s cousin, and Queen Victoria’s granddaughter was at an “at home” one Sunday afternoon at the height of the social season. Another party-goer was Edwin Lutyens, a leading architect of the day. The Princess later claimed that ‘on the impulse of the moment’ she mentioned that it would be nice if the Queen had some sort of large cabinet for all her diminutive treasures.

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Posted by Patrick Owens

Categories: recycled


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Posted on 08 January, 2018

victorian-furniture-late

Late Victorian/Edwardian Dollhouse found on AnniesMinis

Late Victorian Furniture

A revolution was about to take place. Artists and designers revolted against the machine age that replaced an individual’s talent. In furniture, the Arts/Aesthetics and Arts & Crafts movements would round out the Victorian era. And a book would be the focal point.

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Posted by Patrick Owens

Categories: recycled


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Posted on 05 January, 2018

tudor- dolls-house-bedchamber

Margaret Clough’s Tudor dolls house bedchamber

The Tudor Bedchamber

The bed was the largest and most expensive piece of furniture in the Tudor home, its size and quality denoted the owner’s wealth. Everything else in the bedchamber was secondary.

The wealthy purchased four-poster beds, which were elaborately carved, with a canopy and valance of embroidered material. Heavy curtains allowed for privacy (a new concept advanced by the Tutor gentry) and kept out the cold. Edgings of fur were common to hold in warmth; “ermine for the King; squirrel for the middle classes.”

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Posted by Patrick Owens

Categories: recycled


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