Category Archives: recycled

Posted on 05 August, 2017

miss-amy-miles-dolls-house

Miss Amy Miles Dolls’ House, at the Victoria & Albert Museum

Early Victorian Furniture

Queen Victoria’s reign over the British Empire lasted sixty-four years (1837-1901). Many styles of furniture rose and fell in popularity in that time. Combined, they have earned the generic classification – Victorian. There is one common thread, however. Victoria loved ornate styles. Generally, think of cluttered rooms, full of heavy furniture, and surrounded by plants, bulky fabrics and lots of china and glassware. The later Victorian era saw a modest lessening of overcrowded rooms until her son Albert (Bertie) succeeded to the throne as Edward VII and extravagance became the decorating principle.

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Posted by Patrick Owens

Categories: recycled


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Posted on 30 July, 2017

The Work of Ivo Kohek

This is an amazing room box. That is, I think it’s a room box. I can find very little about this wonderful artisan other than what’s on his Facebook Profile. It states that he has lived in Buffalo New York and Sao Paolo Brazil. He currently lives in Porto Alegere in the southern most state of Brazil, Rio Grande Do Sul, a hundred miles or so from the Uruguay border.

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Posted by Patrick Owens

Categories: recycled


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Posted on 26 July, 2017

cabinet-dollhouse-alois-pauli

Cabinet dollhouse made in 1892 by Alois Pauli

Albrecht’s Dollhouse Workshop

In the town of Elsterberg, Germany, not far from the Czech border, is a shop specializing in “beautiful things from the past and the old things newly manufactured.” Besides making sales, the goal of Petra and Albrecht, the owners of Albrecht’s Dollhouse Workshop, is to preserve the tradition of individually created toys and dollhouse miniatures.

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Posted by Patrick Owens

Categories: recycled


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Posted on 24 July, 2017

 astolat-dollhouse-castle

Astolat Dollhouse Castle

Astolat Castle – How It Came About

There are hobbies, then there are obsessions. When Elaine Marie Diehl’s customers entered her miniature shop in Sedona, Arizona, the nine-foot, seven-tiered, meticulously decorated dollhouse just inside the door gave them a clue about the owner.

Making dollhouses began as a hobby for Elaine. She would come home from her day job working in “display art” and play with her latest creation. The miniatures grew in size and price. People dropped by her home unannounced to see her latest creation and after one particularly profitable sale, she decided to give up commercial art and play full time, opening Minielaine’s Miniature Shop in 1981.

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Posted by Patrick Owens

Categories: recycled


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