Dollhouse Decorating

Miniature Decorating Ideas |Articles on decorating dollhouses and the history of this artform

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I have had a life-long love affair with dollhouse miniatures, and careers in art education and interior design. I hope to combine these life experiences to help other miniature enthusiasts get more out of this wonderful hobby we enjoy, a hobby that often reaches the level of an art form. Susan Downing

Posted on 21 May, 2016

victorian-miss-myles-dollhouse

Miss Miles’ House is the only piece in the Victoria and Albert Museum collection that belonged to an actual child.

Susan’s Note:

Idy Keeler gives a good basic list of the types of accessories and pieces of furniture to use in a Victorian dollhouse. I especially like the opening paragraphs where Idy describes how the Victorians got to be so … should I say eclectic with their decorating, interiors and exteriors. Here is Idy’s article:

VICTORIAN ACCESSORIES AND FURNITURE

by Idy Keeler

The Victorian Era (1837 to 1901) was known for its flamboyant, romantic, and excessive decorating style. It represented the wealth and opulence during the reign of Queen Victoria. A Victorian Home was meant to showcase the social standing of the owner. Ornate and excessive touches on everything from furniture to greeting cards marked this period.

This period was influenced by Gothic, Tudor, Elizabethan, Rococo, Baroque, Neoclassical. and Oriental exotic flare. Exquisite furniture & ornamentation gave sophistication and elegance to rooms. Empty space would be quickly wallpapered, and gilded paintings and portraits hung on walls. Lots of knickknacks adorned tables and mantles.

victorian-accessories-bedroom-very-red

Very red Victorian dollhouse bedroom. Original source offline.

This Victorian style is just great for decorating dollhouses for it allows you to run wild with your interior decorating. You can scatter furniture & accessories extravagantly all over. As long as you keep items common during this Era in mind, you can mix and match furniture and accessories freely and the rooms will look great!

Here is a list of accessories and furniture found in a typical Victorian home, to give you ideas on how to make your dollhouse Victorian style. May you have fun decorating your dollhouse!

Victorian Accessories and Touches

Glass covered domes housing prized possessions

Grecian busts, needlepoint pillows

Big Glorious floral arrangements

Rich oriental carpets
Antique porcelain dolls & figurines

Elaborate chandeliers & candelabras

Wrought iron wall sconces

Stained glass windows

Tiffany stained glass lamps
Draperies, beddings, & upholstery fabric made out of lace, embroidery, brocade, & velvet

Silk Embroidered Oriental screens
Potted ferns and palms

Gilded frames for paintings and mirrors

Porcelain vases

Decorative Dishes

Family Photos, diplomas, patterns ,and letters

Doilies & antique needlepoint
Silk fringe lamp shades

Over-mantle

Clocks

Deep, jewel tones like emerald green, ruby, or sapphire for wall paint coloring

victorian-wall-covering-dresser

Christopher Dresser’s (1834-1904) Roland Wall, in terra cotta and burgundy, with a Victory frieze in indigo.

Wallpaper in deep, rich colors with patterns such as flowers, birds, leaves, plants, trellis-work, animals, fruits, trailing vines, landscape scenes,

Greek Urns

Victorian Furniture

Heavy and carved dark wood furniture like mahogany

For Tables:

Decorative scrollwork, ball-and-claw or scroll feet

Inpatterns,pedestal style


Various Louis Style

Ornate coat, hat and umbrella stands

Writing desks

Armoire

Marble-topped tables and chests

Piano

Long Chaise

Settee

Enameled tubs on ball-and-claw or scroll feet

Wicker Furniture for Conservatories and Gardens

Canopied Beds

Globe with stand

Ice Box

Mahogany Chest with Drawers

Fireplace

victorian-accessories-bombe-chest

Miniature Blood Red Bombe Chest found in the WestonMiniature Etsy Shop

Bombe Chest

Grandfather Clock

Spinning Wheel

Queen Anne Furniture

Leather Rocker

 

 

 

I am passionate about all things Victorian.

 

Idy Keeler

 

Posted by Susan Downing

Categories: accessorizing, Victorian


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