Dollhouse Decorating

Miniature Decorating Ideas |Articles on decorating dollhouses and the history of this artform

MyBlog


I have had a life-long love affair with dollhouse miniatures, and careers in art education and interior design. I hope to combine these life experiences to help other miniature enthusiasts get more out of this wonderful hobby we enjoy, a hobby that often reaches the level of an art form. Susan Downing

Posted on 17 May, 2017

vam-18th-century-room-setting-1917

The 18th Century Room Setting as it appeared in 1917. (C) Victoria and Albert Museum, London

18th Century Room Setting

Curator Sarah Wood found that one of the most exciting parts of redisplaying the dolls’ house gallery at the Victoria & Albert Museum has been reviving the so-called ‘18th-century room setting’. This intriguing group of furniture, cutlery, kitchenware, wooden panels, and dolls was purchased by the Victoria & Albert Museum in 1877 when it was bought for £20 from a Staffordshire woman named Mrs. Thornhill.

vam-18th-century-room-setting-final-display

A detail from the final display of the 18the Century Room Setting, (C) Victoria and Albert Museum, London

There are many treasures – brass knives with pistol-shaped handles, a delicate green glass funnel and carafes with minute stoppers, a sturdy silver tankard and many silver plates. Kitchen, dining room and scullery items combine with a chest of drawers and bedroom textiles – giving the impression of a house in disarray, a curious collage of contents.

Over the last year, the Museum of Childhood staff has developed a new display for these lovely old things to show them off better than ever beforeIt is an excellent example of the cooperation with the staff at the V&A. Click on the photograph of the 18th Century Room Setting for a link to Alice Sage’s full article.

 

Susan Downing, with Patrick Owens

_________________________________________________________________________

 

I invite you to visit my Etsy Shop where I offer many accessories and pieces of furniture in 1:12 scale. 

Posted by Patrick Owens

Categories: dolls, Victorian


Print Friendly
Translate »